Ross Bishop

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The Problem With Problems

No one likes having problems. We want an idyllic life, free from stress and difficulty. Most of us long for a life on a south sea island, free from kids and other people, no obligations, no hassles, no problems and free chocolate – right? You’d think the way some people keep their lives in constant tumult that they liked it that way, but you’d be hard pressed to call them happy.
POSTED ON: June 14, 2016, 10:45 am BY Ross Bishop

Negative Thought

Offered the choice between a McDonald’s hamburger and self-condemning negative thoughts, which would you choose? Which one would be worse? The hamburger is loaded with chemicals and preservatives and well, we’re not sure about the negative thoughts. . .
POSTED ON: April 12, 2016, 10:50 am BY Ross Bishop

Playing Small Ball

When you were a child you lived in a narrow world comprised almost entirely of your parents, grandparents and perhaps an occasional aunt or uncle. That was about it. For good or ill, this narrow world shaped your existence. It determined your values, behaviors and beliefs. Whether you agreed with your parents or rebelled against them, their world set the standard through which you viewed life.
POSTED ON: August 16, 2016, 2:25 pm BY Ross Bishop

The Stages of Life

When Ramanaha Maharshi sought to explain life, he used the analogy of a movie. He described life as happening on a movie screen – fleeting, transient images that were not “real”, but gave the appearance of reality. “Reality,” he maintained, took place somewhere else.
POSTED ON: July 5, 2016, 9:10 pm BY Ross Bishop

Disease

If I were to say that emotions play a role in disease, you would agree. If I said that emotions cause disease, some of you would agree. Now, If I said this to your physician, I’d get the equivalent of a blank stare. He wouldn’t deny it outright, but he could not bring himself to accept it either.
POSTED ON: June 7, 2016, 9:45 am BY Ross Bishop

Paradigms

Franciscan author Richard Rohr writes of people of various religious beliefs as frequently being in conceptual “boxes” that prevent them from seeing other’s points of view. George Bernard Shaw once described the situation as, “One religion, a thousand variations.”
POSTED ON: May 10, 2016, 2:30 pm BY Ross Bishop